Rape Culture: Let’s just make shit up as we go along!

Posted: June 29, 2014 in Uncategorized

Do I dare write another bloody blog about rape culture? I think I have to, it’s not necessarily a case of ‘I fucking love talking about rape’ it’s more a case of ‘are these people fucking serious?!’ I’ve written enough blogs on rape culture that I feel like I should be repeating myself, I feel like I shouldn’t have anything left to say. Unfortunately, that is just not the case. It seems new and even more ludicrous examples of rape culture are being dreamt up every single day. I thought we’d reached the Zenith with Blurred Lines being universally declared ‘rapey’ by a bunch of self serving harpies, but  no, the days when Blurred Lines were considered the worst of rape culture are long gone, and I kind of feel a certain pang of nostalgia for them.

There are a few things that have cropped up recently that have covered rape culture in a big way. Obviously the #yesallwomen hashtag is still fighting strong, there was the furore caused by Miss USA’s “let’s teach women how to defend themselves” speech which was pounced on by feminists because, apparently, women being safe is totally the opposite of what they’re fighting for, there was the emergence of the new hashtag #notjusthello, and then there was this piece of absolute idiocy:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hayley-krischer/the-maleficent-rape-scene_b_5445974.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000046

I mean, I was never going to see this film anyway as, generally, anything Disney related recently seems to have such a current of anti-male attitudes I can’t summon the courage watch them. However, I don’t need to have seen the film to see through this quite ludicrous article.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – rape is a horrible crime. It absolutely leaves a lasting effect, it can ruin lives, it can leave people a shell of their former selves, it leaves them broken, alone, suffering and battling just to regain some sort of normality. I’ve never been raped but as a socially awkward, somewhat introverted, man I’ve been through enough uncomfortable experiences to know that if I multiplied them by 100 I would perhaps be somewhere near the amount of pain a rape victim goes through. Not that I’m discounting victims of other crimes, but this blog entry isn’t about other crimes, it’s about rape.

I’ll get into the article in a minute but first I want to talk about why I constantly feel the need to talk about rape culture. I’ve addressed it before, the idea that we live in a culture that normalises and condones rape is so fucking ludicrous it shouldn’t even be given any attention whatsoever. There are numerous stories of men (because it is men) being beaten to a pulp on false accusations, there are stories of women being arrested multiple times for false rape charges and facing no punishment (though there are a couple of cases recently that seem to be changing that trend) and the simple fact that whenever the subject of rape is bought up we immediately use the gendered pronouns ‘he’ as if we just somehow know that only men rape.

Why? Why do we think we live in this ‘culture’ when the evidence suggests that we absolute don’t? Well, do I really need to say the answer? Who is it that constantly harps on about college rape statistics, despite numerous articles proving it wrong, who is it that constantly talks about rape, who is it that talks about objectification and entitlement, who is it that constantly warns women ‘don’t go out at night, the bogeyman will get you!’? It’s feminism. Feminism creates a culture of fear, it strangles women by telling them that rape is around every corner, that rape is at every party, every public event, every time they go shopping, every man they meet, every single time they leave their house they are in imminent danger of being raped.

Kristal Garcia mentioned this in a Google Hangout I did recently – Feminists are basically just Disney princesses, except instead of waiting for their Prince Charming they are waiting for their rapist, waiting for the act that they claim to hate, they claim to despise, yet can’t seem to stop going on about.

Jon Richardson, in his DVD Funny Magnet, told a story about living in London that absolutely makes sense if applied to rape. When watching this clip, every time he says ‘mugged’ replace it with the word ‘rape’:

http://youtu.be/2GPdaTrvZrM

What he says is absolutely right. We are constantly told that ‘1 in 5 women will be raped/sexually assaulted’ and yet the actual statistics released by Police forces in the UK prove that the real statistic is nowhere near that number, even with the ‘90% of rape victims don’t report their rapes’ theory taken into account. Feminists’ constantly harping on about rape, with the false statistics there as helpful ‘evidence’, is doing nothing to actually prevent rape, instead it fosters a culture of fear where women become suspicious of everything and everyone, especially men, whenever they leave the house. For a movement that is supposed to be about empowering women they sure do a good job of reminding them just how much of a victim they are.

I hate the notion of rape culture. It doesn’t exist. Yes, some men rape, some men are arseholes and don’t know what consent is, some men trivialise rape and use the ‘what was she wearing’ speech as a way of justifying it. But, news flash, that is not all men. And, another news flash, women are just as bad, both at committing the crime and trivialising it. Yes, awful things like Stubenville happen, people like Jimmy Saville somehow got away with horrific crimes for years, but that is not all men, it is not all people and it certainly doesn’t warrant the culture of fear and suspicion that feminism currently can’t help but stir.

My theory is simple, feminists love rape. They do. They don’t like the act itself, they think it’s deplorable, which is something I agree with, but they love the fact it happens. What better way to keep themselves in the public eye than to say ‘look at this example and this example and this example and this example of rape culture’. It’s got to the point that people don’t even have to do any reading, they just accept what is being said, they accept it because they’ve been fed this bullshit for so long they don’t know any different. Why should they? These are supposedly respectable women telling them that rape is bad. Who would lie about a crime like that? Not feminists, surely? Especially when they’re the ones who claim to hate it so much?

Third newsflash, feminist lie. They have been doing for years, and rape is number 1 on the agenda. IT keeps them in business, it allows them to influence laws, it allows them to play victim, it allows them a platform to promote their anti-male, anti-female rhetoric, it allows them to manipulate the putty of modern society to their way of thinking, it allows them to mold and reshape and, if something’s not working, to roll it into a ball and re-mold and re-shape.

Anyway, what’s that got to do with this article? Well, I’ll just give you the first 2 paragraphs to start:

Imagine you’re drugged by someone you thought you trusted. You wake up in the morning with your face down in the dirt. You’re aching. Your appearance has changed and you can feel that you’re different as you try to stand through the pain. Beyond the physicality of it, your power was stolen from you. Your flight response. Your dignity.

You’re confused. Enraged. Devastated. Angry. You set everyone on fire around you. You wish hatred on newborn babies. You want to hide in an evil shell of darknesss where everything is black and no one can touch you. Or ever hurt you. They talk about walls on reality TV shows. Oh, you build walls — they’re walls of thorns with armed towering guards that will crush any man who tries to approach it.

Sounds like a pretty horrific ordeal. Could also sound like someone waking up with the worst hangover they’ve ever experienced. I don’t drink, I haven’t for a long time, but I know what a hangover is and how bad they feel. While the above does seem like a rather unsavoury thing, my first thought is not the same as Hayley Krischer’s:

And though it sounds like a rape victim’s story — it’s not. It’s the storyline of Maleficent.

It sounds like a rape story if that’s the way you choose to interpret it. To me, it could be the story of a hangover, or it could even be the story of someone who was mugged and beaten, minus the bit about being drugged. It could even be the story of an operation. I’ve experienced enough operations, or at least medical procedures involving anesthetic, in my time that I know the disoriented feeling you experience upon waking.

This next sentence is, I think, perhaps the most damning in this entire article:

Rape has so permeated our culture that it ended up in a Disney movie.

There are two things to consider when looking at what this actually means. Is this really about rape? Who is responsible for rape ‘permeating’ our culture?

  1. Not having seen the film I can’t comment without any great deal of accuracy but, to me, no this is not about rape at all. At all. It’s about some twat who did something horrible to some woman and she got all pissy afterwards and decided to take her shit out on loads of other people. Far from being a feminist paradise it’s a tale about a woman being too emotionally weak to cope with the actions of one man, instead going full on ‘drama queen’ and blaming everyone. How empowered.
  2. Who is responsible? Do I have to say feminists again? Yes, rape happens, but which group is the one going out there and constantly telling women that they are simply waiting to be victims?

In a wider discussion of rape not only does the feminist movement belittle women, infantilise women, bestow the coveted title of victim on women, it demonises men, all men, with the tag of potential rapist. I’ve had it happen to me, a conversation of Twitter with a feminist where she said every man was a possible rapist. Yes, in the same way every single person on the planet is potentially a drug addict. It’s a ludicrous way of thinking.

Rape has not permeated our culture so much it has wound up in a Disney movie, rape has simply permeated your mindset so much that you see rape in everything that concerns some form of violence. It’s damning because it highlights exactly why the feminist movement is so ludicrous – find rape in every single thing does nothing for the credibility of your movement, it simply paints you out to be morons who search for every opportunity to play the victim.

There’s some more waffle, then there’s this:

But he doesn’t kill her. He rapes her of her ability to fly. He drugs her and leaves her so that he can bring her wings back to the king of the humans like Dorothy was told to fetch the broom of the Wicked Witch. She wakes up moaning, wailing. Stumbling. Utter devastation.

This is how much rape has permeated our culture. Now the act of rape itself isn’t enough to highlight rape culture, instead we have to venture into the world of allegory and metaphor. No, the ‘rape’ scene in Maleficent isn’t about actual rape, it isn’t about a human who loved a fairy drugging her and having sex without her consent, it’s about him taking something that belonged to her.

Now, there is a point in there somewhere. If you want to argue semantics then there are other definitions of rape other than non consensual sex:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/rape

4.

an act of plunder, violent seizure, or abuse; despoliation; violation: the rape of the countryside.

5.

Archaic. the act of seizing and carrying off by force.

 

But have you ever heard feminists use definition 3 and 4 when talking about rape culture? No, I haven’t either. Rape culture is picking and choosing which definition to apply so that it suits your argument. Also, notice the word ‘archaic’ next to definition 5. Archaic means old, out of date, not relevant anymore. Basically, feminists are using an outdated definition of a word in order to further their fascination with rape. They literally find and use any definition that will help their cause.

So, this man hasn’t raped her, he’s taken something that belongs to her, he’s ‘raped her of her ability to fly’ and in order to justify this claim an old, out of date, definition of rape is used. How fitting and how completely unsurprising.

This is perhaps my favourite bit:

My 5-year-old digested the scene as an act of betrayal. She flat-lined the reasoning for Maleficent’s rage: “He cut off her wings.” Maleficent was wounded. But she survived. More, she recovered — physically and psychologically.

That wonderful moment when you realise a 5-year-old girl is more intelligent than a grown woman! It’s beautiful!

Then that grown woman tries to include other grown women in her ridiculous fantasy:

Grown women know better. I know better.

‘Grown women know better’ – yeah, if they’re fucking idiots. The rest of the paragraph goes on to highlight 3 incidences that are pretty terrible. One story is about 2 girls who killed themselves after their rapes were published online, one is (no surprise) about Stubenville and the third is about a drunken sexual assault. Isn’t is weird (not really) how all the women are victims?! No mention of male victims of rape who have been ignored, no mention of all those female teachers who have escaped punishment for raping young boys, no condemnation of Barbara Ellen who justifies the rape of young boys by female teachers by saying it’s a ‘far greyer moral area’ or some other bullshit. Nope, rape culture is only when men are perpetrators and women are victims. No mention of the high school boy who committed suicide after being labeled a sex offender for streaking at a high school football game. Does he not deserve a mention in this fucking idiotic ‘culture’?

The rest of the paragraph contains this:

There is so much rape that when you write a story about a woman at her most vulnerable point (is drugged in the dirt enough for you?), rape becomes the symbol. Even if that’s not the writer’s intention.

If there was ever a sentence or two that aptly described why I think rape culture is bullshit then this is it. She outright admits that she will twist whatever message the author was intending and make it about rape instead, then uses the excuse that there is ‘so much rape’ in the world as a justification. This story is about a vulnerable woman, that much is true, but to say ‘that means this is symbolic of rape’ and we ‘have’ to talk about it is so far beyond anything that is reasonable it shouldn’t have been published on a website as popular as The Huffington Post.

There are so many other symbols, allegories and metaphors that can be applied to this particular story that it could have opened a pretty interesting discourse. It’s about losing trust, losing faith, recovering from betrayal, recovering from a life changing act,  feelings of loneliness and isolation, rebuilding yourself, it could be cancer, it could be amputation, it could be absolutely anything, anything to do with loss or pain or grief or feelings of revenge and retribution. It speaks a lot about the nature of rape culture when a woman will willingly find the act of rape in a situation that could be a metaphor for any number of things and then claim it proves we live in that culture.

No, it proves that you are so desperate to find rape in anything that you look for it in a Disney movie, a film that even your 5 year old daughter seems to understand better.

Is there an allegory for rape in the storyline of the film Maleficent? Sure, why not. Is it the only allegory? No. Does it prove a certain culture exists? No. If it was the only reading you could take away from the film then you might just be on a more secure footing, but the fact that you can apply a lot of allegorical meaning to this film suggests that it’s only indicative of a culture that you apply to it. If the author’s intentions were not to write an allegory for rape culture than your interpretation is simple that – your interpretation. But then, it’s typical of feminism to claim to speak for the majority when that is simply not the case.

I’m not going to highlight every other piece of this article because it follows the same train of thought – rape is prevalent and it’s horrific that it found its way into a Disney movie.

She ends with this:

But Maleficent is a commentary on current male and female relationships. It’s a commentary on rape culture. And much more, it’s a story that allows a woman to recover. It gives her agency. It gives her power. It allows her to reclaim the story. And this is something that can’t be ignored.

Another ‘let me speak for everyone’ piece of drivel. No, it is not a commentary on male and female relationships. That is simply your interpretation. It’s not a commentary on rape culture, anymore than it’s a commentary on overcoming betrayal. Yes, it’s a story that allows a woman to recover, yes it does all the things you claim it does, but that’s because she’s had her wings cut off, not because she was raped. It’s as simple as that. A 5 year old girl, the target audience, understands that, the writer herself understands that, yet you want to apply a meaning that doesn’t exists, simply so that it fits your victim narrative on rape culture and how everything is about victimisation and empowerment!

Let’s take the thinking from this film and apply it to others just to show how ridiculous it is to see rape in every film.

300 – Leonidas sends Dilios home with a message for his queen. He ‘rapes’ him of his power to fight Xerxe’s army.

Gladiator – before their final fight, Commodus stabs Maximus with a knife. He ‘rapes’ him of his power before fighting him.

Liar Liar – Fletcher Reed’s son makes a wish that his dad can’t lie for 24 hours. Reed’s career is built on him lying, so his son ‘rapes’ him of the ability to perform his job.

Ridiculous isn’t it? That’s what feminism does, it takes a concept and applies it to anything it can think of in order to further its own victim status. It creates a self perpetuating circle of rape that it can present whenever necessary.

‘Look at these rape statistics. Never mind that they’re false, never mind that we’re being dishonest, never mind that these statistics will demonise men, just look at how bad they look. Are you suitably scared yet? Good, now let us tell you that any time you might have got drunk and kissed a man that’s probably rape too. Yeah, you didn’t know what you were doing on account of the drink. We think you’re more than capable, intelligent young adults, so let us tell you that you definitely were raped, you didn’t want it, you didn’t ask for it, you didn’t deserve it. Even more scared yet? Ok, well how about if we tell you that walking home at night means you’ll probably get raped to. Yep, you’ll get raped if you’re outside at night. In fact, you might get raped during the day, too. Actually, you might get burgled and raped at home. Do you want to stop that happening? Good, then join Feminism! We’re here to tell you exactly when you were raped, but don’t ever forget you’re a strong, capable woman.’

Yeah, it’s an over-exaggeration, but not by much. Want to know why I think feminists love rape culture so much? It gives them control, it gives them power. It gives them the power that they crave – the power to make women hate men, to fear men, to treat men with caution and suspicion and distrust. Why? Because they want to rule the world and it’s easier to recruit people if you tell them who their enemy is. The best way to tell them who the enemy is is to constantly tell them about an evil group of bastards who will subjugate you to nothing but fear and violence all your life.

But here’s the thing, rape culture is just as demeaning to women as it is to men. Not only is it demonising to men, telling them that they are just as responsible for rape as the miniscule percentage of men that commit it, but it infantilises women, it reduces their existence to nothing but potential victims, it tells them that the situation is out of their hands. It tries to imply the only power women have is through feminism. When a movement actively discourages women from learning how to defend themselves it simply suggests they don’t want women to be able to defend themselves. It suggests that, when the time comes, they want women to be the victims, they want women to be so immersed in the circle of fear that they feel they have no option but to follow the movement that will ‘save’ them.

Telling women not to learn self defense is not the trademark of a movement for ‘empowerment’, it is the sign of a movement that wants nothing more than as many women as possible to be victims so it can further it’s malicious campaign. Feminism doesn’t want women to be empowered, not unless ‘empowered’ means ‘so weak you have no choice but to let us tell you how to live your life.’

Maleficent is not an example of rape culture. It can be twisted and manipulated to fit a certain metaphorical, symbolic or allegorical agenda, but so can a lot of crimes. To claim that the ‘rape scene’ is one that ‘needs’ to be talked about is a dishonest portrayal of an ambiguous scene as something that is definite and absolute. If the article was ‘the scene in Maleficent could be construed as a survivor’s story’ then I’d have no problem but, as usual, feminism isn’t about multiple and various interpretations, it’s about the one thing that they can use to make them out to be the biggest victims.

Rape culture is not the condoning and trivialising of the act of rape, rape culture is where feminism applies rape to every single thing they can think of in order to try and play the victim card. It is where they demean women’s intelligence by supposing to tell them what they should and should not be fearing, how they should and shouldn’t behave, that taking self defense classes (which actually is empowering) is somehow not a good idea. It is a culture where they keep women scared. That, to me, is insulting to women.

We do not live in a rape culture. When you see an article expressing concern that an allegory of rape appears in a Disney film yet you don’t see an article condemning people like Barbara Ellen for writing about ‘grey moral areas’ in rape cases and people like Amy Schumer for raping drunk guys that should be evident enough.

Rape culture is not the condoning and trivialising of the act of rape, it is the ignoring of male rape victims in order to find, by any means necessary, allegories and metaphors in Disney films that fit your feminist bullshit rhetoric.

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Comments
  1. Zodak says:

    i haven’t seen the movie either & don’t intend to, but now theft is equal to rape? what nonsense. these feminists are obsessed with it.

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